GIAMPA TOUR
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WESTMAN & BAKER
George Kuthan's, Honey Suckle Press
CANADIAN PLATEN PRESS

I LANSTON TYPE COMPANY I GERALD GIAMPA I

GERALD GIAMPA'S FIRST PRESS. In 1963 Giampa purchased this hand-fed platen press from the late George Kuthan. This had been George's press for printing lino-cuts and publishing private press limited editions.

Kuthan was working on 'Aphrodite's Cup' published under the imprint of the 'Honey Suckle Press' at that time.This book was a series of multi-coloured lino-cuts of a saucy sexually explicit nature. There were thirty leaves, the presswork was masterfully performed by Ib Kristensen.

'Aphrodite's Cup' was banned in British Columbia.

Although originally slated for installation in the basement of Giampa's Grandmother's home at 382 East St. James, North Vancouver his first press was installed in his parents' basement at 2742 Crestlynn Drive, Lynn Valley. Giampa's mother displayed her most dourness of moods during this installation.

Later Cobblestone Press had two other locations in Lynn Valley. For several years Giampa had a commercial shop at 1305 Lynn Valley Road. Then Giampa purchased a house and moved his shop into the basement at 3668 Maginnis Avenue. He was nineteen at that time.

George Kuthan, lino cut artist
Honey Suckle Press
MMII Copyright: Giampa, Photograph 1964 by David Whitmore
GERALD GIAMPA'S FIRST PLATEN PRESS
Westman & Baker, Hand Fed Platen
GEORGE KUTHAN'S HONEY SUCKLE PRESS

THE CANADIAN COMPANY WESTMAN & BAKER, manufactured platen presses and paper cutters. The platens were not of the clam shell variety. Instead they were configured with a sliding wedge that fell behind the platen while on impressional dwell giving a balanced impressional axis. The throw off lever was a short stroke and close at hand.

Printers thinking this press followed the "clam shell" principle had troubles. Most pressman never understood the "clam shell" configuration either. The type forme should have been slightly lower than the centre horizontal axis, and mid vertical. The trade books read 'slightly above'. Sorry old timers, you did it wrong all your life.