GIAMPA TOUR
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PRINTERS' FLEURONS
Printers Fleurons, Monotype Keyboard
JOHN DREYFUS, TYPOGRAPHER

I LANSTON TYPE COMPANY I GERALD GIAMPA I

GERALD GIAMPA'S austere design gallery was the wall behind this (American) Lanston Monotype Keyboard and Giant Caster in the old Northland Letterpress Company on Pender Street, Vancouver, British Columbia. In this make-do-gallery Giampa viewed his ornamental arrangements when they were in progress. This familiarization method allowed Giampa to continue other works as he planned his way to final settings. The particular gallery of work in progress was for book binding papers for 'Typographical Bouquets' by the well respected printing historian John Dreyfus.

You will notice the sheet on the top right has a piece of paper pasted and superimposed on the one beneath. This was one of Giampa's methods of developing new arrangements. All of the arrangements in this particular piece were worked in such a fashion. The softer faded looking sheets are the colour experiments.

This design for the binding paper had only one design element, or ornament, turned left, while others were turned right, up or under, arranged and repeated. It illustrates well the multitude of possibilities of design using only one ornament. Granjon fleurons, on the other hand, have a multitude of ornaments, or units, designed to work in concert with each other. They deeply rooted among some of the earliest certainly the most cohesive fleuron elements in the history of printing.

'Typographical Bouquets' was set in Fournier. The text was short, illustrations many.

printers fleuron design
© MMII Copyright: Gerald Giampa
BOOK BINDING ENDPAPERS
Gerald Giampa, Fleuron Studio
GIAMPA'S DESIGN WALL

GERALD GIAMPA is especially original in his choice and combination of various coloured inks, and also in the skill with which he eliminates parts of a flower in order to obtain a simpler and more striking effect. He super-imposes colours with great subtlety, so that they blend in the most harmonious way. He succeeds because he plans his effects with meticulous care. His handling of printers' flowers combines knowledge and skill with taste and judgement. So my final typographical bouquet goes to the printer of these lines, to whom the words of the prophet Ezekiel (8:20) can be aptly applied: "As for the beauty of his ornament, he set it in majesty."

JOHN DREYFUS
Printing Historian